Sunday, March 12, 2017

Elinor Lipman, Tim Gautreaux, "Modern Death,"..and our first preschool story time!

logo
Its all happening this week at The Regulator
 
Tuesday evening we welcome the marvelous Elinor Lipman with her latest novel, On Turpentine Lane. Conventional wisdom has it that Elinor Elinor Lipman Lipman writes romantic comedy (rom-com, for short). Well let me tell you that I am decidedly not a rom-com guy, but I am just loving reading On Turpentine Lane. If rom-com is an author writing exceedingly well about characters she clearly cares about, with a sense of humor and an appreciation for the absurdities of life--sign me up for more!
 
And I can tell you from experience that Elinor Lipman in person is every bit as engaging as her books. Come to The Regulator Tuesday at 7:00 p.m. and give yourself an enjoyable break from reading the news! (See the great things the New York Times had to say about On Turpentine Lane in our events listing below).
 
Wednesday night Louisianan Tim Gautreaux comes to the store to read from his acclaimed new book Signals: New and Selected Stories.
Tim Gautreaux writes riveting stories of down on their luck folks in the Tim Gautreaux rural south. He is one of those writers that other writers study and marvel at (see the comments on the book's dust jacket). And Gautreaux himself, as an undergraduate, studied under another Southern master, James Dickey. Reflecting on this, Rebecca Lee wrote in the New York Times:  
 
"In the humble and great problems strewn through Gautreaux's excellent stories, in his primal forests and his crumbling mansions, in his beautiful and intelligent and ambitious sentences, I find (James) Dickey himself after all these years. He practically shakes my hand. And there is (Flannery) O'Connor too, over by herself, asking us all to please quit making such a big deal of things and tell the story. Gautreaux does them both proud."

Then Thursday night Duke M.D. Harder Warraich will be at The Regulator to read from and discuss his splendid, important new book,
Modern Death: How Medicine Changed the End of Life. Modern Death is a wonderful combination of science, medicine, and humanity, written with grace and compassion. This book brilliantly expands upon and adds to the conversation started with Atul Gawande's Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End. If you think that you or someone you care about just might die someday...come talk about it at The Regulator Thursday at 7:00.

"Harder Warraich has looked at modern death with the cool eye of a scientist, and the heart of a humane doctor. It's a wonderful combination of history, anatomy, public policy, and storytelling. A warm and thorough guide to living well all the way to the end."--Ellen Goodman, Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and New York Times bestselling author of I Know Just What You Mean and Paper Trail
 
"Warraich demystifies what is known and unknown about how cells and bodies die, while sensitively grappling with the changing cultural landscape surrounding the end of life, including patients who tweet and share the details of their decline on social media. His story is filled with compassionate accounts of the different ways he has witnessed people meet death in the modern age."--Scientific American
 
And on a lighter note-we hold our first Wednesday morning (10:15) preschool story time with Amy Godfrey this Wednesday!
 Upcoming Events   

You can see our complete events calendar on our website

ELINOR LIPMAN
Tuesday, March 14, 7:00PM
Acclaimed best-selling author Elinor Lipman comes to The Regulator with her highly praised new book, On Turpentine Lane, an endearing romantic comedy from the beloved author of The Family Man and The View from Penthouse B. Lipman may well have invented the screwball romantic comedy for our era, and here she is at her sharpest and best. On Turpentine Lane is funny, poignant, and a little bit outrageous.
 
"Light and tight, 'On Turpentine Lane' is constructed with an almost scary mastery. Not a single thread dangles, not a single character is left without a place in Faith's world.  The story folds out and back in as neatly as an origami flower, and Faith recounts it all with a raised eyebrow and plenty of cheek." -- New York Times Book Review
 
Elinor Lipman is the author of ten novels, including Dearly Departed and The Inn at Lake Devine. She lives in Massachusetts and New York City.

PRESCHOOL STORY TIME
Wednesday, March 15, 10:15AM
Join us for Preschool Storytime at The Regulator with Amy Godfrey. Free!
Amy Godfrey loves telling stories. With 10 years of experience as a Children's Librarian, Amy Godfrey is known for her energetic musical story times. Amy will be bringing fun and stories to The Regulator every Wednesday morning.
 
TIM GAUTREAUX
Wednesday, March 15, 7:00PM
Tim Gautreaux will read from and sign his new short story collection, Signals: New and Selected Stories. After the stunning historical novels The Clearing and The Missing, Gautreaux now ranges freely through contemporary life with twelve new stories and eight from previous collections. Most are set in his beloved Louisiana, many by the Mississippi River, others in North Carolina and even in midwinter Minnesota. But generally it's heat, humidity, and bugs that beset his people as they wrestle with affairs of the heart and matters of faith.
 
"With searing truthfulness, great humor, and abiding love, Tim Gautreaux reveals how an astonishing variety of hard-bitten, good-hearted working people both shape and are shaped by his beloved and endlessly intriguing Louisiana back country. Signals is the most entertaining and original story collection to come out of the American South in many years." -Howard Frank Mosher
 
Timothy Martin Gautreaux is the award-winning author of three novels and two earlier short story collections. His work has appeared in The New Yorker, The Best American Short Stories, The Atlantic, Harper's, and GQ. After teaching for thirty years at Southeastern Louisiana University, he now lives, with his wife, in Chattanooga.
 
HAIDER J. WARRAICH
Thursday, March 16, 2017 at 7:00PM
Haider Warraich, MD, will discuss his debut book, Modern Death: How Medicine Changed the End of Life. Delving into the vast body of research on the evolving nature of death, Dr. Warraich provides readers with an enriched understanding of how death differs from the past, what our ancestors got right, and how trends and events have transformed this most final of human experiences. A new brilliant voice in the conversation about death and dying Warraich takes a broader look at how we die today, from the cellular level up to the very definition of death itself.
 
"There is no topic more universal--or more universally unnerving--than death. Haider Warrich's Modern Death is a much-needed exploration of this treacherous territory, offering clear-eyed analysis of what it means to die in America today and how to focus one's own life toward a saner and gentler denouement."--Danielle Ofri, MD, PhD, author of What Patients Say; What Doctors Hear
 
Haider Warraich is a fellow in cardiovascular medicine at Duke University Medical Center. He is a regular Op Ed contributor for the New York Times, as well as the Atlantic, Guardian, Wall Street Journal and LA Times amongst others. He has appeared on CNN, CBS, PBS, NPR, and the BBC World Service.
 
RICKY GARNI
Tuesday, March 21, 2017 at 7PM
Join us for a fun evening of poetry with Durham-Chapel Hill resident Ricky Garni who will be at The Regulator to read and sign copies of his new collection, Divisive Potatoes. Garni's poems have been called "lighter than air, crisp and refreshing, salty and snacky...with meaning and good cheer."
 
Ricky Garni has worked over the years as a teacher, wine merchant, musician, and graphic designer. A Duke graduate, Garni began writing poetry in 1978, and has produced over thirty volumes of prose and verse since 1995. He has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize on seven occasions.
 
PRESCHOOL STORY TIME
Wednesday, March 22, 10:15AM
Join us for Preschool Storytime at The Regulator with Amy Godfrey. Amy Godfrey, a Children's Librarian for 10 years, is known for her energetic musical story times and is bringing that fun to The Regulator every Wednesday!

LISA YARGER
OFFSITE: Duke Center for Documentary Studies, 1317 W Pettigrew St.
Wednesday, March 22 6:00PM -- Please note TIME & LOCATION
Lisa Yarger, author of Lovie: The Story of a Southern Midwife and an Unlikely Friendship,  will give a talk and book signing at The Center for Documentary Studies. From 1950 until 2001, Lovie Beard Shelton practiced midwifery in eastern North Carolina homes, delivering some 4,000 babies to black, white, Mennonite, and hippie women; to those too poor to afford a hospital birth; and to a few rich enough to have any kind of delivery they pleased. Her life, which was about giving life, was conspicuously marked by loss, including the untimely death of her husband and the murder of her son.

Lovie is a provocative chronicle of Shelton's life and work, which spanned enormous changes in midwifery and in the ways women give birth. As Lovie describes her calling, we meet a woman who sees herself working in partnership with God and who must wrestle with the question of what happens when a woman who has devoted her life to service, to doing God's work, ages out of usefulness. When I'm no longer a midwife, who am I? Facing retirement and a host of health issues, Lovie attempts to fit together the jagged pieces of her life as she prepares for one final home birth.

MICHELE MOORE
Thursday, March 23, 7:00PM
Michele Moore's novel The Cigar Factory tells the story of two entwined families, both devoutly Catholic-the white McGonegals and the African American Ravenels-in the storied port city of Charleston, South Carolina, during the world wars. The Cigar Factory follows the parallel lives of family matriarchs working on segregated floors of the massive Charleston cigar factory, where white and black workers remain divided and misinformed about the duties and treatment each group receives.  Segregation keeps them from recognizing their common plight until the Tobacco Workers Strike of 1945 -- a powerful moment in labor history that gives rise to the civil rights anthem "We Shall Overcome." With a foreword by Pat Conroy.
 
Michele Moore has served as a fellow in the English Department at Piedmont College in Demorest, Georgia. She was a 2006 finalist for the Bellwether Prize for Literature and her creative nonfiction has been broadcast on Georgia Public Radio and published in numerous journals and has won several awards and grants from arts organizations in the Southeast.

WILL SCHWALBE
Friday, March 24 at 7:00PM
New York Times best-selling author Will Schwalbe will read from and discuss his new book, Books for Living at The Regulator. An inspiring and magical exploration of the power of books to shape our lives in an era of constant connectivity, Books for Living provides an impassioned recommendation of specific books that can help guide us through our daily lives.
 
"Schwalbe's 'manifesto for readers' is not about his favorite books but those that helped him when he had a need. Written in a chatty, conversational style, the book is thematically organized by a wide variety of needs: slowing down, searching, trusting, napping, praying, etc.... In an age when the number of readers is declining, a delightful book like this might just snare a few new recruits." -Kirkus Reviews
 
Will Schwalbe has enjoyed a storied career in publishing (most recently with MacMillan); digital media, as the founder and CEO of Cookstr.com; and as a journalist, writing for various publications, including The New York Times and the South China Morning Post. He is the author of The End of Your Life Book Club, and coauthor, with David Shipley, of Send: Why People Email So Badly and How to Do It Better.
 
Shop Independent Durham
Tom Campbell
Regulator Bookshop
720 Ninth St.
Durham, NC 27705
(919) 286-2700
http://www.regulatorbookshop.com/

Saturday, March 4, 2017

Preschool Story Time, Audio Books, and Great Upcoming Events

logo
Preschool Story Time at The Regulator!
We're thrilled to announce that we will be hosting a fabulous preschool story time every Wednesday morning at 10:15, beginning Wednesday March 15--a week from this Wednesday. Our storyteller will be Amy Godfrey, who brings with her 10 years of experience as a children's librarian. She is also an illustrator (you can see some of her art here) and she plays cello and ukulele. And yes, she sometimes adds music to her stories!

Bring your preschoolers and join in the fun! And hey, no need to feel left out if you don't have any preschoolers. These story times will have a "fun for all ages" guarantee!
Like listening to books? Now you can buy audio books through our website
Through a new partnership between Libro.fm and hundreds of independent bookstores across the country, our customers can now access headphones more than 70,000 audio books through a link on our website. Libro offers free iOS and Android apps, and their audio books are DRM-free, which means they can be listened to on multiple devices. You can buy individual titles or sign up for a membership where your first audiobook costs $0.99 and then you pay a monthly fee of $14.99 for one audiobook per month.
 
Learn more through the "Digital Audiobooks" link on the bottom right of the front page of our website, or follow this link now: https://libro.fm/regulatorbookshop
 Upcoming Events   

A visit from a former North Carolina Poet Laureate, followed by Elinor Lipman, Tim Gautreaux, and an important new book on Modern Death: How Medicine Changed the End of Life highlight our events for the next two weeks.
(You can also see our complete events calendar on our website)  
    
 
KARIN L. ZIPF
Monday, March 6 at 7PM
Karin L. Zipf comes to The Regulator for a discussion of her new book, Bad Girls at Samarcand: Sexuality and Sterilization in a Southern Juvenile Reformatory. In Bad Girls, Zipf dissects a dark episode in North Carolina's eugenics campaign through a detailed study of the State Home and Industrial School in Eagle Springs, referred to as Samarcand Manor, and the school's infamous 1931 arson case. Bad Girls at Samarcand is a fascinating story that grapples with gender bias, sexuality, science, and the justice system all within the context of the Great Depression-era South.
 
Karin L. Zipf is an Associate Professor of History at East Carolina University who was born in Durham and raised in Rocky Mount. Her research focuses on the relationship of women and children to the State, particularly in the areas of sexuality, labor and race politics.
 
JOSEPH BATHANTI
Tuesday, March 7, 7:00PM
The Regulator welcomes Joseph Bathanti for a reading and book signing of new collection of poems, The 13th Sunday After Pentecost. Bathanti offers poems that delve deep into a life reimagined through a mythologized past. Moving from his childhood to the present, weaving through the Italian immigrant streets of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to his parochial school, from the ballpark to church and home again, these contemplative poems present a situation unique to the poet but familiar to us all.
Joseph Bathanti served as the Poet Laureate for North Carolina from 2012 to 2014 and was the recipient of the 2016 North Carolina Award for Literature. Bathanti is Professor of Creative Writing at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC, and the University's Watauga Residential College Writer-in-Residence.

APS CAT ADOPTION EVENT
Sunday, March 12, 2:00 pm
Durham Animal Protection Society will hold a monthly cat adoption event at the Regulator. Come visit our furry friends from 2:00 - 3:30.
 
ELINOR LIPMAN
Tuesday, March 14, 7:00PM
Acclaimed best-selling author Elinor Lipman comes to The Regulator with her highly praised new book, On Turpentine Lane, an endearing romantic comedy from the beloved author of The Family Man and The View from Penthouse B. Lipman may well have invented the screwball romantic Elinor Lipman comedy for our era, and here she is at her sharpest and best. On Turpentine Lane is funny, poignant, and a little bit outrageous.
 
"Light and tight, 'On Turpentine Lane' is constructed with an almost scary mastery. Not a single thread dangles, not a single character is left without a place in Faith's world.  The story folds out and back in as neatly as an origami flower, and Faith recounts it all with a raised eyebrow and plenty of cheek." -- New York Times Book Review
 
Elinor Lipman is the author of ten novels, including Dearly Departed and The Inn at Lake Devine. She lives in Massachusetts and New York City.

PRESCHOOL STORY TIME
Wednesday, March 15, 10:15AM
Join us for Preschool Storytime at The Regulator with Amy Godfrey. Free!
Amy Godfrey loves telling stories. With 10 years of experience as a Children's Librarian, Amy Godfrey is known for her energetic musical story times. Amy will be bringing fun and stories to The Regulator every Wednesday morning.
 
TIM GAUTREAUX
Wednesday, March 15, 7:00PM
Tim Gautreaux will read from and sign his new short story collection, Signals: New and Selected Stories. After the stunning historical novels The Clearing and The Missing, Gautreaux now ranges freely through contemporary life with twelve new stories and eight from previous collections. Most are set in his beloved Louisiana, many by the Mississippi River, others in North Carolina and even in midwinter Minnesota. But generally it's heat, humidity, and bugs that beset his people as they wrestle with affairs of the heart and matters of faith.
 
"With searing truthfulness, great humor, and abiding love, Tim Gautreaux reveals how an astonishing variety of hard-bitten, good-hearted working people both shape and are shaped by his beloved and endlessly intriguing Louisiana back country. Signals is the most entertaining and original story collection to come out of the American South in many years." -Howard Frank Mosher
 
Timothy Martin Gautreaux is the award-winning author of three novels and two earlier short story collections. His work has appeared in The New Yorker, The Best American Short Stories, The Atlantic, Harper's, and GQ. After teaching for thirty years at Southeastern Louisiana University, he now lives, with his wife, in Chattanooga.
 
HAIDER J. WARRAICH
Thursday, March 16, 2017 at 7:00PM
Haider Warraich, MD, will discuss his debut book, Modern Death: How Medicine Changed the End of Life. Delving into the vast body of research on the evolving nature of death, Dr. Warraich provides readers with an enriched understanding of how death differs from the past, what our ancestors got right, and how trends and events have transformed this most final of human experiences. A new brilliant voice in the conversation about death and dying Warraich takes a broader look at how we die today, from the cellular level up to the very definition of death itself.
 
"There is no topic more universal--or more universally unnerving--than death. Haider Warrich's Modern Death is a much-needed exploration of this treacherous territory, offering clear-eyed analysis of what it means to die in America today and how to focus one's own life toward a saner and gentler denouement."--Danielle Ofri, MD, PhD, author of What Patients Say; What Doctors Hear
 
Haider Warraich is a fellow in cardiovascular medicine at Duke University Medical Center. He is a regular Op Ed contributor for the New York Times, as well as the Atlantic, Guardian, Wall Street Journal and LA Times amongst others. He has appeared on CNN, CBS, PBS, NPR, and the BBC World Service.
 
Shop Independent Durham
Tom Campbell
Regulator Bookshop
720 Ninth St.
Durham, NC 27705
(919) 286-2700
http://www.regulatorbookshop.com/

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

The Regulator gets historical

logo
No, not hysterical. Historical!
Tomorrow (Thursday) night we host a marvelous writer, teacher, scholar and professor (Emeritus) of history, Sydney Nathans, discussing his new book A Mind to Stay: White Plantation, Black mind to stay Homeland. A Mind to Stay is a fascinating look at the struggles of a group of black families that have lived in central Alabama, enslaved and free, for more than 150 years. Following the Civil War, these families were able to buy the land they had worked as slaves. Reading their histories brings to mind the old civil rights song "We Shall Not Be Moved." And come heck or high water, they have not been moved! Syd Nathans is a born storyteller, a craft he expertly employs here through a combination of oral and archival history. There's a major local connection in this book as well--the Alabama plantation was founded by the owner of Durham's Stagville Plantation, Paul Cameron.

Then on Monday (Feb 27) we welcome historian A. Roger Ekirch and his new book American Sanctuary: Mutiny, Martyrdom, and National Identity in the Age of Revolution. American Sanctuary is a great example American Sanctuary of the relevance and usefulness of history. How can something that happened more than 200 years ago matter to us today? Well this is the story of a man named Jonathan Robbins who sought, but was denied refuge in the United States in 1797 by President John Adams. Robbins, originally from Danbury Connecticut, had been "impressed' (forced) into service in the British Navy and then participated in a bloody mutiny that killed a British sea captain. Adams handed him over to be hanged by British authorities. The resulting uproar played no small part in Thomas Jefferson's 1800 presidential election victory. In his first State of the Union address Jefferson asked rhetorically, "Shall oppressed humanity find no asylum on this globe?"-an echo of Thomas Paine's earlier entreaty "O! receive the fugitive, and prepare in time an asylum for mankind."

We end the month Tuesday evening with Richard Rosen and Joseph julius Chambers Mosnier's acclaimed biography of North Carolina's (and Durham's) Julius Chambers: A Life in the Legal Struggle for Civil Rights. Lawyer Julius Chambers was involved in many of our state's and our country's landmark civil rights cases, beginning in the 1960s, persevering and often triumphing in the face of everything from the dynamiting of his home to the arson that destroyed his small law office. Julius Chambers went on to serve as Chancellor of his alma mater, North Carolina Central University.
 
Come to The Regulator to learn from and be inspired by the lessons of history! See more on these and all of our events for the next two weeks on our events schedule below.
We'll Always Have Casablanca
While we're on the subject of history, allow me to bend your ear for a moment on a new book that I love. We'll Always Have Casablanca: The Life, Legend, and Afterlife of Hollywood's Most Beloved Movie by Noah Isenberg.
 
Casablanca As told by Noah Isenberg, the back story of the making of Casablanca is every bit as enthralling as the film itself. From its origins as a play written by a New York City high school English teacher, after an evening spent in a smoky bar filled with refugees outside of Nice in 1938 (with a black crooner from Chicago playing the piano), to the stories of the movie's supporting cast--largely made up of exiles from Hitler's Europe--this book is filled with fascinating characters and stories that add greatly to our appreciation of this marvelous film. But be warned! As soon as you finish this book you're going to want to see the movie all over again! And you're going to like it even more after you've read "We'll Always Have Casablanca." 
A couple of likely links
If you missed Tim Tyson talking about his new book, The Blood of Emmett Till, you can watch C-SPAN's Book TV recording of the event here:

And here is a heart-warming, 5 minute BBC radio piece on a "Door to Door Poet" plying his trade in the north of England:
 Upcoming Events--through March 7  

(You can also see our complete events calendar on our website)      

SYDNEY NATHANS
Thursday, February 23, 7:00PM
Sydney Nathans will read and sign his new book,  A Mind to Stay: White Plantation, Black Homeland.  
The exodus of millions of African Americans from the rural South is a central theme of black life and liberation in the 20th century. A Mind to Stay offers a counterpoint to the narrative of the Great Migration. Sydney Nathans tells the rare story of people who moved from being enslaved to becoming owners of the very land they had worked in bondage, and who have held onto it from emancipation through the Civil Rights era. Through the prism of a single plantation and the destiny of black families that dwelt on it for over a century and a half, A Mind to Stay illuminates the changing meaning of land and land owning to successive generations of rural African Americans.

Sydney Nathans is Professor Emeritus of History, Duke University. He was selected as the winner of the 2013 Frederick Douglass Book Prize for his book To Free a Family: The Journey of Mary Walker
(Harvard University Press). The Douglass Prize is awarded annually by Yale's Gilder Lehrman Center for the best book written in English on slavery or abolition.

A. ROGER EKIRCH
Monday, February 27, 7:00PM
A. Roger Ekirch will be at The Regulator for a reading and book signing of his new naval history, American Sanctuary: Mutiny, Martyrdom, and National Identity in the Age of Revolution.

American Sanctuary is the extraordinary story of the mutiny aboard the frigate HMS Hermione in 1797 (eight years after the mutiny on the Bounty)--the bloodiest mutiny ever suffered by the Royal Navy, that led to the extradition of the martyred sailor Jonathan Robbins from America to Britain. This event plunged the 20-year-old American Republic into a constitutional crisis, and powerfully contributed to the outcome of the U.S. presidential election of 1800. Ekirch shows how the "Robbins Affair" was responsible for America's historic decision to grant political asylum to refugees from foreign governments, fulfilling Thomas Paine's notion of America as "an asylum for mankind" -- and propelled the issue of political asylum and extradition to the fore-- an issue still being debated today--more than 200 years later.
 
A. Roger Ekirch was born in Washington, D.C., and raised in Alexandria, Virginia, and Delmar, New York. He is the author of Bound for America, Birthright, and At Day's Close. He holds degrees from Dartmouth College and John Hopkins University, and is a professor of history at Virginia Tech.

RICHARD ROSEN and JOSEPH MOSNIER
Tuesday, February 28 at 7:00PM
Join us for a reading and talk by Richard Rosen and Joseph Mosnier, authors of Julius Chambers: A Life in the Legal Struggle for Civil Rights.
Born in Mount Gilead, NC, Julius Chambers (1936-2013) escaped the fetters of the Jim Crow South to emerge in the 1960s and 1970s as the nation's leading African American civil rights attorney. Following passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Chambers worked to advance the NAACP Legal Defense Fund's strategic litigation campaign for civil rights, ultimately winning landmark school and employment desegregation cases at the U.S. Supreme Court. Chambers served as Chancellor of his alma mater, North Carolina Central University, from 1993-2001 and was a Distinguished Professor of Law there.

Richard A. Rosen is professor of law emeritus at the UNC-Chapel Hill.
Joseph Mosnier is assistant director for strategy and communication at the North Carolina State University's Institute for Emerging Issues.
 
MICHAEL MCFEE
Wednesday, March 1, 7:00PM
Durham treasure Michael McFee comes to The Regulator for a reading of his newest book of poetry, We Were Once Here.
This new collection contains thoughtful and playful celebrations of such things as snoring, a wall telephone from the 1960s, yardsticks, the Sunday newspaper, and Fats Waller. It also extends the poet's characteristic lyric keenness into longer work, including a twenty-one-part centerpiece elegy for his niece. The book concludes with, and is framed by, poems that explore the bittersweet enduring joys of "here."
 
" "...a strong, moving collection from one of our most quietly remarkable poets." --Philip Memmer
 
Michael McFee, a native of Asheville, North Carolina, has taught poetry writing at UNC-Chapel Hill since 1990. He is the author or editor of fifteen books and he lives in Durham.
 
MELISSA EGGLESTON & JULIE LELLIS
Thursday, March 2 at 7:00PM
Join communication experts Julie Lellis and Melissa Eggleston at The Regulator for the launch of their new business book, The Zombie Business Cure: How to Refocus your Company's Identity for More Authentic Communication.*
Discover common communication mistakes that make you confusing to audiences and learn valuable tips you can start using immediately to improve your communication-and bottom line. *Thanks to KIND for providing tasty snacks at this event!
 
Julie Lellis is a strategic communications professor at Elon University and a consultant who helps clients communicate more accurately and effectively in a mindful way.
Melissa Eggleston is a content strategist and user experience (UX) specialist with clients throughout the United States. She has created digital content for Bloomberg News, the Content Marketing Institute, Duke University, and many other organizations.
 
BARRY FRIEDMAN
Friday, March 3, 7:00PM
Barry Friedman will be at The Regulator for a discussion of his new book, Unwarranted: Policing Without Permission.
Unwarranted tells the stories of ordinary people whose lives were torn apart by policing--by the methods of cops on the beat and those of the FBI and NSA. Friedman captures the eerie new environment in which CCTV, location tracking, and predictive policing have made suspects of us all, while proliferating SWAT teams and increased use of force have put everyone's property and lives at risk. Unwarranted is a critical, timely intervention into debates about policing, a call to take responsibility for governing those who govern us.
"A powerful manifesto against unbalanced policing methodologies and an illuminating and sobering critique of political and legal forces in the U.S." -Booklist

Barry Friedman is the Jacob D. Fuchsberg Professor of Law at New York University School of Law and the director of the Policing Project. For thirty years he has taught, written about, and litigated issues of constitutional law and criminal procedure. He is the author of The Will of the People. His writing has appeared in The New York Times, Slate, and The New Republic, among other publications. He lives with his wife and two children in New York City.
 
KARIN L. ZIPF
Monday, March 6 at 7PM
Karin L. Zipf comes to The Regulator for a discussion of her new book, Bad Girls at Samarcand: Sexuality and Sterilization in a Southern Juvenile Reformatory. In Bad Girls, Zipf dissects a dark episode in North Carolina's eugenics campaign through a detailed study of the State Home and Industrial School in Eagle Springs, referred to as Samarcand Manor, and the school's infamous 1931 arson case. Bad Girls at Samarcand is a fascinating story that grapples with gender bias, sexuality, science, and the justice system all within the context of the Great Depression-era South.
 
Karin L. Zipf is an Associate Professor of History at East Carolina University who was born in Durham and raised in Rocky Mount. Her research focuses on the relationship of women and children to the State, particularly in the areas of sexuality, labor and race politics.
 
JOSEPH BATHANTI
Tuesday, March 7, 7:00PM
The Regulator welcomes Joseph Bathanti for a reading and book signing of new collection of poems, The 13th Sunday After Pentecost. Bathanti offers poems that delve deep into a life reimagined through a mythologized past. Moving from his childhood to the present, weaving through the Italian immigrant streets of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to his parochial school, from the ballpark to church and home again, these contemplative poems present a situation unique to the poet but familiar to us all.
Joseph Bathanti served as the Poet Laureate for North Carolina from 2012 to 2014 and was the recipient of the 2016 North Carolina Award for Literature. Bathanti is Professor of Creative Writing at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC, and the University's Watauga Residential College Writer-in-Residence. He served as
 
Shop Independent Durham
Tom Campbell
Regulator Bookshop
720 Ninth St.
Durham, NC 27705
(919) 286-2700
http://www.regulatorbookshop.com/