Tuesday, April 11, 2017

This week: Two wonderful women writers, two nights in a row!

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Stephanie Powell Watts on Wednesday, Lee Smith on Thursday

Thursday evening we host the marvelous Lee Smith,
in celebration of the paperback release of her thoroughly enjoyable memoir, Dimestore: A Lee Smith 2.0 Writer's Life. If you have yet to spend some time with Lee, or if haven't spent time with her recently, or even if you just had dinner with her last night...you are in for a treat if you come to The Regulator Thursday night at 7:00. It is a truth universally acknowledged that Lee Smith is one of our local treasures. See more on Lee and Dimestore in our events listing below.


On Wednesday, the night before Lee Smith's reading, we host a new writer whose first novel is getting incredible reviews from all quarters. No One is Coming to Save Us by Stephanie Powell Watts is a brilliant recasting of The Great Gatsby among African-Americans in a small town in North Carolina. But I am here to tell you that you don't have to know anything about Gatsby to be completely entranced with this great new novel.
 
Watts Stephanie Powell Watts can flat out write. Wednesday night you will have a chance to catch a remarkable new writer at the very beginning of her career. And you don't have to just take my word on this. Here are some of the early reviews of No One is Coming to Save Us:
 

"Watts is so captivating a writer ... (with) a prose style that renders the common language of casual speech into natural poetry, blending intimate conversation with the rhythms of gossip, town legend, even song lyrics ... What Watts has done here is more captivating than another retread about the persistence of a crook's dream. She's created an indelible story about the substance of a woman's life."
--Ron Charles, The Washington Post
 
"Watts writes about ordinary people leading ordinary lives with an extraordinary level of empathy and attention."
--Jade Chang, The New York Times Book Review
 
"In the best possible way, this is the kind of book that makes a reader yearn for her next one."
--Sarah Begley, Time
 
"It should not go unsaid that the central characters are African-American, a deliberate choice in a narrative that doesn't so much adapt as wink at a classic that kept those kinds of characters on the margins. For the most part, they are still on the margins. But No One Is Coming to Save Us pivots the default lens to spotlight their experience - the poverty surrounding them, the pain they harbor and the peace in letting that pain go. In the hands of a less competent author, this could have devolved into mere voyeurism into the traumas and triumphs of black people. Instead, Watts, with her knowing touch and full-bodied prose, delivers a resonant meditation on life and the comfort both in dreaming and in moving forward."
--Jaleesa M. Jones, USA Today
 
"Watts powerfully depicts the struggles many Americans face trying to overcome life's inevitable disappointments. But it's the compassion she feels for her characters' vulnerability and desires that make the story so relevant and memorable."
--Publishers Weekly

 Our Upcoming Events for the next two weeks. Poetry, sci fi, history, and a Ninth Street Sidewalk Sale!

You can see our complete events calendar on our website

STEPHANIE POWELL WATTS
Wednesday, April 12, 7:00PM
Stephanie Powell Watts joins Travis Mulhauser (Sweetgirl) in conversation about Powell Watts's debut novel, No One is Coming to Save Us --a brilliant recasting of The Great Gatsby among African Americans in the South. A story about the ghosts of the past and departed, as well as the lives of the living, the novel is a complex, post-integrationist tale that charts new territory in the New South. "Stephanie Powell Watts's inspired reimagining of the novel long regarded as the American masterwork of the twentieth century gives soul, body, and voice to those left out of Scott Fitzgerald's vision of the American dream."-- Sigrid Nunez, author of The Last of Her Kind and Sempre Susan.
 
Stephanie Powell Watts is an associate professor of English at Lehigh University, and has won numerous awards, including a Whiting Award, a Pushcart Prize, and the Southern Women's Writers Award for Emerging Writer of the Year. She is the author of the short story collection, We Are Taking Only What We Need. Travis Mulhauser's novel Sweetgirl was long-listed for The Center for Fiction's First Novel Prize, an Indie Next Pick, and winner of a Michigan Notable Book Award in 2017. He is from northern Michigan and lives in Durham, North Carolina with his wife and two children.
 
LEE SMITH
Thursday, April 13, 7:00 p.m.
Bestselling author and Hillsborough darling Lee Smith will read from her memoir, Dimestore: A Writer's Life in celebration of its paperback release. Set deep in the rugged Appalachian Mountains, the Grundy, West Virginia of Lee Smith's youth was a place of coal miners, mountain music, and her daddy's dimestore. It was in that dimestore--listening to customers and inventing life histories for the store's dolls--that she began to learn the craft of storytelling.
 
"Smith delivers a memoir that shines with a bright spirit, a generous heart and an entertaining knack for celebrating absurdity."-The New York Times Book Review
 
Lee Smith began writing stories at the age of nine and selling them for a nickel apiece. Since then, she has written seventeen works of fiction, including Fair and Tender Ladies, Oral History, and, most recently, Guests on Earth. She lives in Hillsborough with her husband, the writer Hal Crowther.

ERDAĞ GÖKNAR
Saturday, April 15, 7:00PM
Turkish scholar Erdağ Göknar comes to The Regulator for a reading and book signing of his new collection of poetry, Nomadologies --
a significant literary and scholarly work of poetry on Turkish diaspora and Turkish-American cultural conflict. Nomadologies is an insightful collection for readers interested in Turkish and Islamic culture, those interested in questions of exile and definitions of home, and those who are looking for great new lyrical poetry.                  
"Göknar takes us on a dazzling virtual world tour encompassing history, aesthetics, and politics, from Bosnia to Chechnya to the Silk Road to Union Square and back to the place that was once the center of the civilized world, Istanbul/Constantinople." -Richard Tillinghast, author of An Armchair Traveller's History of Istanbul

Erdağ Göknar (MFA, Univ. of Oregon) is the award-winning translator of Nobel laureate Orhan Pamuk's My Name is Red and Ahmet Hamdi Tanpınar's A Mind at Peace. A recipient of two Fulbright awards, he teaches Turkish and Middle Eastern Studies at Duke, and directs the Duke University Middle East Studies Center. Nomadologies is his first collection of poetry.  
   
JOHN KESSEL
Tuesday, April 18, 7:00PM
Science fiction writer John Kessel will read from and sign copies of his Moon and the other newest book, The Moon and the Other. One of the most visionary writers in the field, Kessel has created a rich matriarchal utopia, set in the near future on the moon, a society that is flawed by love and sex, and on the brink of a destructive civil war.

"The future has seldom been imagined with such intensity of detail. John Kessel has shot the moon with this book."  Karen Joy Fowler

John Kessel lives in Raleigh, North Carolina with his wife, novelist Therese Anne Fowler. He is a professor and the director of creative writing at North Carolina State University. He is the author of The Baum Plan for Financial Independence and Other Stories and Corrupting Dr. Nice.
 
PRESCHOOL STORY TIME
Wednesday, April 19, 10:15AM
Join us for Preschool Storytime at The Regulator Bookshop. Free!
With 10 years of experience as a Children's Librarian, Amy Godfrey is known for her energetic musical story times and is bringing that fun to The Regulator on Wednesday mornings.
 
BENJAMIN C. WATERHOUSE
Thursday, April 20, 7:00PM
The Regulator welcomes Benjamin Waterhouse for a discussion about his new book Land of Enterprise: A Business History of the United States.
The Land of Enterprise, a new, gripping history of America-told through the executives, bankers, farmers, and politicians who paved the way from colonial times to the present-reveals that this country was founded as much on the search for wealth and prosperity as the desire for freedom. Waterhouse's new book is not only a comprehensive look into our past achievements, but offers clues as to how to confront the challenges of today's world: globalization, income inequality, and technological change.

Benjamin C. Waterhouse is a historian of 20th century American politics, business, and capitalism. He is associate professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
 
SPRING DISCOUNT CLUB SALE AND 9TH ST. SIDEWALK SALE
Saturday, April 22, 10AM -- 8PM
Join The Regulator and other fine 9th St. Merchants for our annual Spring Sidewalk Sale! Stroll the length of 9th St. in Durham on Saturday, April 22 for superior quality and value, and great finds!

PLUS, The Regulator's  20% OFF Discount Club Membership Sale is THIS SATURDAY (April 22). For members of our discount club, all books in the store will be 20% off. Come get your Mother's Day/Father's Day/Graduation Day shopping done early. Shop local!
 
Shop Independent Durham
Tom Campbell
Regulator Bookshop
720 Ninth St.
Durham, NC 27705
(919) 286-2700
http://www.regulatorbookshop.com/

Thursday, March 30, 2017

Russian Bears and Every Body Yoga! Our Upcoming Events.

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 Upcoming Events--including brain surgery!  

You can see our complete events calendar on our website

TONY BARTELME
Thursday, March 30, 7:00PM
Pulitzer finalist Tony Bartelme comes to The Regulator for a reading and book signing of his new book, A Surgeon in the Village: An American Doctor Teaches Brain Surgery in Africa -- an inspiring story of doctors Surgeon who changed the health care of an African nation.

"A lyrical, inspirational and altogether rewarding account of first- and third-world surgeons working together to perform neurosurgery miracles in the heart of Africa." -Tom Brokaw

Tony Bartelme is the senior projects reporter for the Post and Courier in Charleston, South Carolina. He spent four years researching and writing this book, including multiple trips to Tanzania. In 2011, Bartelme was a Pulitzer Prize finalist for his series of articles that is the basis for this book, the third time he has been a Pulitzer finalist.

LISA DICKEY
Friday, March 31, 7:00PM
Join us for Lisa Dickey's talk about her critically-acclaimed new book, Bears in the Streets: Three Journeys Across A Changing Russia. Dickey Bears traveled across the whole of Russia three times--in 1995, 2005 and 2015--making friends in eleven different cities, then coming back over the course of 20 years to see how their lives had changed. From the caretakers of a lighthouse in Vladivostok, to the Jewish community of Birobidzhan, to a group of gay friends in Novosibirsk, to a rap star in Moscow, Dickey profiles a wide cross-section of people in one of the most fascinating, dynamic and important countries on Earth. Including powerful photographs of people and places over time, Bears in the Streets offers an unprecedented on-the-ground view of Russia today.

Lisa Dickey helped write and/or edit seventeen published books, including eight New York TImes Best Sellers, on notable topics such as the musicians Herbie Hancock and Whitney Houston, modern citizenship with Gavin Newsome, overturning the Defense of Marriage act, and the AOL/Time Warner merger.

PAULI MURRAY HOME NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARK CELEBRATION
Saturday, April 1, 2017 from 1:00PM -- 5:00PMPauli Murray Family Home, 906 Carroll Street, Durham. Please note time and location.
The Regulator will be on-site selling books as we celebrate the designation of the Pauli Murray Family home as a National Historic Landmark by the National Park Service; plaque presentation from the National Park Service, readings, poetry, art, food, and community walks. All are welcome. For more information: http://paulimurrayproject.org/homecoming-celebration-of-national-historic-landmark-designation-saturday-april-1-2017/
 
KIESE LAYMON
Monday, April 3, 7:00PM -- 8:00PM, Hayti Heritage Center, 804 Old Fayetteville St., Durham, NC 27701 Please note time and location. 
Author Kiese Laymon (How to Kill Yourself and Others in America) will read from his forthcoming memoir and participate in a discussion with the audience and the moderator, Duke University Professor Mark Anthony Neal.A reception will follow, and The Regulator will have Laymon's books available for sale. This program is presented as a partnership between Duke's Forum for Scholars and Publics and Scalawag, a Durham-based magazine about politics and culture in the American South. For more information: https://fsp.trinity.duke.edu/projects/heavy-american-memoir-reading-and-conversation
 
Kiese Laymon is Professor of English and African American Studies at the University of Mississippi. The author of the novel Long Division (winner of the 2014 Saroyan International Writing Award) and a collection of essays, How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America, Laymon was selected a member of Ebony Magazine Power 100 in 2015. He has two books forthcoming, including a memoir, Heavy: A Fat Black Memoir, and a novel, And So On.
 
JESSAMYN STANLEY
Tuesday, April 4, 2017 at 7:00PM, Motorco Music Hall: 723 Rigsbee Ave. Please note location. 
Entry is FREE; books will be for sale at the event.
Join Durham's own yoga superstar Jessamyn Stanley for her hometown Yoga book launch and book signing at MOTORCO Music Hall! A yogi who breaks all the stereotypes, Jessamyn will talk about her path to internet fame and empowered entrepreneurship, as well as her body-positive, emotionally uplifting approach to yoga. In Every Body Yoga: Let Go of Fear, Get on the Mat, Love Your Body, Jessamyn Stanley offers an unprecedented new guide to yoga- specifically for anyone who has ever felt as though their body was too different to start a practice. Written for both beginners and experienced readers looking to refresh their practice, the book shares easy-to-follow instructions to 50 basic yoga poses and ten sequences to practice at home, all photographed in full color. Along the way, Stanley upends the paradigm by showing that yoga isn't about how one looks, but how one feels. Her body-positive, emotionally uplifting approach to yoga will help every reader discover the power of yoga and how to weave it seamlessly into his or her life.
 
Jessamyn Stanley is a yoga teacher, body positive advocate, and writer based in Durham, North Carolina. Jessamyn uses high energy vinyasa flow as a way to move past mental and emotional barriers. Stanley's funny, brash, kind, and brutally honest approach to tackling big topics- fat-shaming, body image and the media, the tyranny of unattainable beauty standards- has garnered her over 226K followers on Instagram, features in Good Morning America, Glamour, Shape, Elephant Journal, The Sunday Times, New York Times, and People, among others, and acclaim as an internationally- celebrated yoga instructor.
 
PRESCHOOL STORY TIME
Wednesday, April 8, 10:15AM -- please note the time.
Join us for Preschool Storytime at The Regulator. With 10 years of experience as a children's librarian, Amy Godfrey is known for her energetic musical story times and is bringing that fun to The Regulator on Wednesday mornings! Ages 2-5.
 
MARIE HICKS
Wednesday, April 5 at 7:00PM
Join Marie Hicks for a reading and signing of her new book, Programmed Inequality: How Britain Discarded Women Technologists and Lost Its Edge in Computing. Programmed Inequality takes aim at the fiction of technological meritocracy. Hicks explains why, even today, possessing technical skill is not enough to ensure women will rise to the top in science and technology fields. Programmed Inequality shows how, following World War II, the disappearance of women from the field had grave macroeconomic consequences for Britain, and why the United States risks repeating those errors in the twenty-first century.
    
Marie Hicks is an assistant professor of history of technology at Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, Illinois. Hicks received her MA and Ph.D. from Duke University and her BA from Harvard University. Before entering academia, she worked as a UNIX systems administrator.
 
JOHN MANUEL
Friday, April 7, 2017 at 7:00PM, Motorco Music Hall,
723 Rigsbee Ave, Durham, NC 27701. Please note the location. 
Put on your dancing shoes! Join John Manuel for a "Night of Reading and Music" at Motorco to celebrate the launch of his new book, Hope Valley. Books will be available for sale courtesy of The Regulator Bookshop. The Bull City Beatniks and the Chit Nasty Band will provide the dance music. The event is free and open to the public.
 
John Manuel is a long-time Durham resident who has published two nonfiction books, The Natural Traveler Along North Carolina's Coast and The Canoeist. As a freelance environmental journalist, he has published numerous articles in such magazines as Audubon, Environmental Health Perspectives, and Wildlife in North Carolina. His short stories have appeared in The Savannah Journal and New Southerner. Hope Valley is his first novel.
 
APS CAT ADOPTION EVENT
Sunday, April 9, 2:00PM
Durham Animal Protection Society will hold a monthly cat adoption event at the Regulator. Come visit our furry friends from 2:00 - 3:30. Note the time and date.

[NO PRESCHOOL STORYTIME THIS WEEK - (Wed. April 12 - NO Story Time) -- Join us the following Wednesday when we return to our every-Wednesday schedule.]

STEPHANIE POWELL WATTS
Wednesday, April 12, 7:00PM
Stephanie Powell Watts joins Travis Mulhauser (Sweetgirl) in conversation about Powell Watts's debut novel, No One is Coming to Save Us --a brilliant recasting of The Great Gatsby among African Americans in the South. A story about the ghosts of the past and departed, as well as the lives of the living, the novel is a complex, post-integrationist tale that charts new territory in the New South. "Stephanie Powell Watts's inspired reimagining of the novel long regarded as the American masterwork of the twentieth century gives soul, body, and voice to those left out of Scott Fitzgerald's vision of the American dream."-- Sigrid Nunez, author of The Last of Her Kind and Sempre Susan.
 
Stephanie Powell Watts is an associate professor of English at Lehigh University, and has won numerous awards, including a Whiting Award, a Pushcart Prize, and the Southern Women's Writers Award for Emerging Writer of the Year. She is the author of the short story collection, We Are Taking Only What We Need. Travis Mulhauser's novel Sweetgirl was long-listed for The Center for Fiction's First Novel Prize, an Indie Next Pick, and winner of a Michigan Notable Book Award in 2017. He is from northern Michigan and lives in Durham, North Carolina with his wife and two children.
 
LEE SMITH
Thursday, April 13, 7:00 p.m.
Bestselling author and Hillsborough darling Lee Smith will read from her memoir, Dimestore: A Writer's Life in celebration of its paperback release. Set deep in the rugged Appalachian Mountains, the Grundy, West Virginia of Lee Smith's youth was a place of coal miners, mountain music, and her daddy's dimestore. It was in that dimestore--listening to customers and inventing life histories for the store's dolls--that she began to learn the craft of storytelling.
 
"Smith delivers a memoir that shines with a bright spirit, a generous heart and an entertaining knack for celebrating absurdity."-The New York Times Book Review
 
Lee Smith began writing stories at the age of nine and selling them for a nickel apiece. Since then, she has written seventeen works of fiction, including Fair and Tender Ladies, Oral History, and, most recently, Guests on Earth. She lives in Hillsborough with her husband, the writer Hal Crowther.
 
Shop Independent Durham
Tom Campbell
Regulator Bookshop
720 Ninth St.
Durham, NC 27705
(919) 286-2700
http://www.regulatorbookshop.com/

Sunday, March 12, 2017

Elinor Lipman, Tim Gautreaux, "Modern Death,"..and our first preschool story time!

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Its all happening this week at The Regulator
 
Tuesday evening we welcome the marvelous Elinor Lipman with her latest novel, On Turpentine Lane. Conventional wisdom has it that Elinor Elinor Lipman Lipman writes romantic comedy (rom-com, for short). Well let me tell you that I am decidedly not a rom-com guy, but I am just loving reading On Turpentine Lane. If rom-com is an author writing exceedingly well about characters she clearly cares about, with a sense of humor and an appreciation for the absurdities of life--sign me up for more!
 
And I can tell you from experience that Elinor Lipman in person is every bit as engaging as her books. Come to The Regulator Tuesday at 7:00 p.m. and give yourself an enjoyable break from reading the news! (See the great things the New York Times had to say about On Turpentine Lane in our events listing below).
 
Wednesday night Louisianan Tim Gautreaux comes to the store to read from his acclaimed new book Signals: New and Selected Stories.
Tim Gautreaux writes riveting stories of down on their luck folks in the Tim Gautreaux rural south. He is one of those writers that other writers study and marvel at (see the comments on the book's dust jacket). And Gautreaux himself, as an undergraduate, studied under another Southern master, James Dickey. Reflecting on this, Rebecca Lee wrote in the New York Times:  
 
"In the humble and great problems strewn through Gautreaux's excellent stories, in his primal forests and his crumbling mansions, in his beautiful and intelligent and ambitious sentences, I find (James) Dickey himself after all these years. He practically shakes my hand. And there is (Flannery) O'Connor too, over by herself, asking us all to please quit making such a big deal of things and tell the story. Gautreaux does them both proud."

Then Thursday night Duke M.D. Harder Warraich will be at The Regulator to read from and discuss his splendid, important new book,
Modern Death: How Medicine Changed the End of Life. Modern Death is a wonderful combination of science, medicine, and humanity, written with grace and compassion. This book brilliantly expands upon and adds to the conversation started with Atul Gawande's Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End. If you think that you or someone you care about just might die someday...come talk about it at The Regulator Thursday at 7:00.

"Harder Warraich has looked at modern death with the cool eye of a scientist, and the heart of a humane doctor. It's a wonderful combination of history, anatomy, public policy, and storytelling. A warm and thorough guide to living well all the way to the end."--Ellen Goodman, Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and New York Times bestselling author of I Know Just What You Mean and Paper Trail
 
"Warraich demystifies what is known and unknown about how cells and bodies die, while sensitively grappling with the changing cultural landscape surrounding the end of life, including patients who tweet and share the details of their decline on social media. His story is filled with compassionate accounts of the different ways he has witnessed people meet death in the modern age."--Scientific American
 
And on a lighter note-we hold our first Wednesday morning (10:15) preschool story time with Amy Godfrey this Wednesday!
 Upcoming Events   

You can see our complete events calendar on our website

ELINOR LIPMAN
Tuesday, March 14, 7:00PM
Acclaimed best-selling author Elinor Lipman comes to The Regulator with her highly praised new book, On Turpentine Lane, an endearing romantic comedy from the beloved author of The Family Man and The View from Penthouse B. Lipman may well have invented the screwball romantic comedy for our era, and here she is at her sharpest and best. On Turpentine Lane is funny, poignant, and a little bit outrageous.
 
"Light and tight, 'On Turpentine Lane' is constructed with an almost scary mastery. Not a single thread dangles, not a single character is left without a place in Faith's world.  The story folds out and back in as neatly as an origami flower, and Faith recounts it all with a raised eyebrow and plenty of cheek." -- New York Times Book Review
 
Elinor Lipman is the author of ten novels, including Dearly Departed and The Inn at Lake Devine. She lives in Massachusetts and New York City.

PRESCHOOL STORY TIME
Wednesday, March 15, 10:15AM
Join us for Preschool Storytime at The Regulator with Amy Godfrey. Free!
Amy Godfrey loves telling stories. With 10 years of experience as a Children's Librarian, Amy Godfrey is known for her energetic musical story times. Amy will be bringing fun and stories to The Regulator every Wednesday morning.
 
TIM GAUTREAUX
Wednesday, March 15, 7:00PM
Tim Gautreaux will read from and sign his new short story collection, Signals: New and Selected Stories. After the stunning historical novels The Clearing and The Missing, Gautreaux now ranges freely through contemporary life with twelve new stories and eight from previous collections. Most are set in his beloved Louisiana, many by the Mississippi River, others in North Carolina and even in midwinter Minnesota. But generally it's heat, humidity, and bugs that beset his people as they wrestle with affairs of the heart and matters of faith.
 
"With searing truthfulness, great humor, and abiding love, Tim Gautreaux reveals how an astonishing variety of hard-bitten, good-hearted working people both shape and are shaped by his beloved and endlessly intriguing Louisiana back country. Signals is the most entertaining and original story collection to come out of the American South in many years." -Howard Frank Mosher
 
Timothy Martin Gautreaux is the award-winning author of three novels and two earlier short story collections. His work has appeared in The New Yorker, The Best American Short Stories, The Atlantic, Harper's, and GQ. After teaching for thirty years at Southeastern Louisiana University, he now lives, with his wife, in Chattanooga.
 
HAIDER J. WARRAICH
Thursday, March 16, 2017 at 7:00PM
Haider Warraich, MD, will discuss his debut book, Modern Death: How Medicine Changed the End of Life. Delving into the vast body of research on the evolving nature of death, Dr. Warraich provides readers with an enriched understanding of how death differs from the past, what our ancestors got right, and how trends and events have transformed this most final of human experiences. A new brilliant voice in the conversation about death and dying Warraich takes a broader look at how we die today, from the cellular level up to the very definition of death itself.
 
"There is no topic more universal--or more universally unnerving--than death. Haider Warrich's Modern Death is a much-needed exploration of this treacherous territory, offering clear-eyed analysis of what it means to die in America today and how to focus one's own life toward a saner and gentler denouement."--Danielle Ofri, MD, PhD, author of What Patients Say; What Doctors Hear
 
Haider Warraich is a fellow in cardiovascular medicine at Duke University Medical Center. He is a regular Op Ed contributor for the New York Times, as well as the Atlantic, Guardian, Wall Street Journal and LA Times amongst others. He has appeared on CNN, CBS, PBS, NPR, and the BBC World Service.
 
RICKY GARNI
Tuesday, March 21, 2017 at 7PM
Join us for a fun evening of poetry with Durham-Chapel Hill resident Ricky Garni who will be at The Regulator to read and sign copies of his new collection, Divisive Potatoes. Garni's poems have been called "lighter than air, crisp and refreshing, salty and snacky...with meaning and good cheer."
 
Ricky Garni has worked over the years as a teacher, wine merchant, musician, and graphic designer. A Duke graduate, Garni began writing poetry in 1978, and has produced over thirty volumes of prose and verse since 1995. He has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize on seven occasions.
 
PRESCHOOL STORY TIME
Wednesday, March 22, 10:15AM
Join us for Preschool Storytime at The Regulator with Amy Godfrey. Amy Godfrey, a Children's Librarian for 10 years, is known for her energetic musical story times and is bringing that fun to The Regulator every Wednesday!

LISA YARGER
OFFSITE: Duke Center for Documentary Studies, 1317 W Pettigrew St.
Wednesday, March 22 6:00PM -- Please note TIME & LOCATION
Lisa Yarger, author of Lovie: The Story of a Southern Midwife and an Unlikely Friendship,  will give a talk and book signing at The Center for Documentary Studies. From 1950 until 2001, Lovie Beard Shelton practiced midwifery in eastern North Carolina homes, delivering some 4,000 babies to black, white, Mennonite, and hippie women; to those too poor to afford a hospital birth; and to a few rich enough to have any kind of delivery they pleased. Her life, which was about giving life, was conspicuously marked by loss, including the untimely death of her husband and the murder of her son.

Lovie is a provocative chronicle of Shelton's life and work, which spanned enormous changes in midwifery and in the ways women give birth. As Lovie describes her calling, we meet a woman who sees herself working in partnership with God and who must wrestle with the question of what happens when a woman who has devoted her life to service, to doing God's work, ages out of usefulness. When I'm no longer a midwife, who am I? Facing retirement and a host of health issues, Lovie attempts to fit together the jagged pieces of her life as she prepares for one final home birth.

MICHELE MOORE
Thursday, March 23, 7:00PM
Michele Moore's novel The Cigar Factory tells the story of two entwined families, both devoutly Catholic-the white McGonegals and the African American Ravenels-in the storied port city of Charleston, South Carolina, during the world wars. The Cigar Factory follows the parallel lives of family matriarchs working on segregated floors of the massive Charleston cigar factory, where white and black workers remain divided and misinformed about the duties and treatment each group receives.  Segregation keeps them from recognizing their common plight until the Tobacco Workers Strike of 1945 -- a powerful moment in labor history that gives rise to the civil rights anthem "We Shall Overcome." With a foreword by Pat Conroy.
 
Michele Moore has served as a fellow in the English Department at Piedmont College in Demorest, Georgia. She was a 2006 finalist for the Bellwether Prize for Literature and her creative nonfiction has been broadcast on Georgia Public Radio and published in numerous journals and has won several awards and grants from arts organizations in the Southeast.

WILL SCHWALBE
Friday, March 24 at 7:00PM
New York Times best-selling author Will Schwalbe will read from and discuss his new book, Books for Living at The Regulator. An inspiring and magical exploration of the power of books to shape our lives in an era of constant connectivity, Books for Living provides an impassioned recommendation of specific books that can help guide us through our daily lives.
 
"Schwalbe's 'manifesto for readers' is not about his favorite books but those that helped him when he had a need. Written in a chatty, conversational style, the book is thematically organized by a wide variety of needs: slowing down, searching, trusting, napping, praying, etc.... In an age when the number of readers is declining, a delightful book like this might just snare a few new recruits." -Kirkus Reviews
 
Will Schwalbe has enjoyed a storied career in publishing (most recently with MacMillan); digital media, as the founder and CEO of Cookstr.com; and as a journalist, writing for various publications, including The New York Times and the South China Morning Post. He is the author of The End of Your Life Book Club, and coauthor, with David Shipley, of Send: Why People Email So Badly and How to Do It Better.
 
Shop Independent Durham
Tom Campbell
Regulator Bookshop
720 Ninth St.
Durham, NC 27705
(919) 286-2700
http://www.regulatorbookshop.com/